A Residence Blog

Travel and adventure taking, memory and home making, parenting and play shaking, never faking, tales of family life.

A Residence Blog

Travel and adventure taking, memory and home making, parenting and play shaking, never faking, tales of family life.

How to make Bath Bombs

How to make bath bombs

My eight year old daughter made soap over the summer at Camp Bestival, she loves Science and so she wanted to make more at her birthday party. She also threw bath bombs at me as a challenge. I was a bit daunted at first, but they are actually unbelievably simple to make, the first one I made worked brilliantly and even when teaching  7 busy eight year olds, the results were great, you can see from the picture. So I thought I would share with you how to make bath bombs!

Ingredients

300g Sodium Bicarbonate/  100g Citric Acid/  10ml of almond oil/  Water in a spray bottle /  Dried petals/ Colouring – suitable for use in cosmetics/  Scent – suitable for use in cosmetics

I also used the scents and colour with some melt and pour soap. More on soap in another post!

Equipment – plastic cup, scales, sieve, mixing bowl, food prep gloves, moulds – you can buy ball shaped ones of these, or improvise with silicone ice cube tray moulds or cake moulds which are so easy to peel off and so perfect for little fingers.

I love this cupcake silicone mould, and this one or even better these heart shaped silicone moulds all available from Wayfair.co.uk.

DSC06511

Method One –  for making one colour and fragrance only. Makes 5-6 round 2 inch bombs

Do not touch your eyes when making this, have a big bowl of soapy water ready so you/kids can wash hands when you need to. Gloves are handy to discourage this or if you have cuts in the skin, as citric acid can sting.

1. Mix the sodium bicarb and citric acid in a bowl until thoroughly blended, sieving helps, although I forgot this bit and it still worked.

2. Mix 10ml of oil, 20-60 drops of colour and up to 40 drops of fragrance in a plastic cup.

3. Add the smelly, coloured oil to the sodium and citric acid mix. It may well fizz, so stir rapidly and blend with the back of a metal spoon, or get stuck in and use gloved hands to blend in the oil. This can take a bit of blending, but it is amazing how the colour develops!

4. Add your petals at this stage.

5. Spray the mix with water, continuing to mix all the time, be cautious, you are aiming to get to only to the point where the mixture just holds together when lightly squeezed in your hand. It doesn’t want to be sticky.

6. Press the mixture tightly into your mould and smooth it level. If you are using a two piece mould like in the picture below, you need to hold the two pieces together tightly and clip them together, you might need to give both sides a spritz of water to help them adhere.

For silicone moulds, just smooth over, or make a dome for a cupcake if you fancy! We also pressed petals into the top of some of the cupcake style bombs.

DSC06568

Method Two – for making with 5 kids/making 5 different colours

Do not touch your eyes when making this, have a big bowl of soapy water ready so you/kids can wash hands when you need to. Gloves are handy to discourage this or if you have cuts in the skin as citric acid can sting.

1. Mix the sodium bicarb and citric acid in a bowl until thoroughly blended, sieving helps, but I forgot this bit and it still worked.

2. Invite each child to measure enough mix to fill their mould, heaping scoops using their mould should work.

3. Ask each child to choose and their colour and scent. Using a (medicine) measuring spoon give each child 2 ml of oil. You can add the scent and colour to the oil on a spoon for them OR let them add first colour and mix, then scent and mix, then oil and mix. Five drops of each seemed to work well as a guide, but let eyes and noses be your guide!

Follow steps 4-6 above.

Why not also try….

Mixing all the colours for amazing rainbow coloured bombs.

Dividing the mix in half and making each of the two halves of the bombs different colours and complementary fragrances?

Making planets by packing the mould to represent land and sea or craters. I tried planet Earth above.

Matching colours to fragrance e.g. Green Apple Bombs or Blue Bubblegum bombs.

Using the fragrance and colour with melt and pour soap? I have some fab Snowglobe soap ideas in this post.

Missie Lizzie’s Olbas Oil Bath Bombs for colds

Red Ted Art’s bath bombs with Cream of Tartar instead of Citric Acid.

I bought a big kit, so now I know how to make bath bombs, I am looking forward to making lots as Christmas presents.

Find more creative things to make and do on A Residence blog.

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